​​Journal Articles - System Options


  
  
Document Title
Journal Description
  
Multi-input, Multi-output Hybrid Energy Systems1/20/2021

​Jurisdictions and industries are setting ambitious goals to decarbonize energy systems. Low-cost wind, solar, and natural gas and the resultant dynamic electric grid require energy technologies to adapt in order to meet key attributes for modern energy systems: resilience, reliability, security, affordability, flexibility, and sustainability. 

​​Jurisdictions and industries are setting ambitious goals to decarbonize energy systems. Low-cost wind, solar, and natural gas and the resultant dynamic electric grid require energy technologies to adapt in order to meet key attributes for modern energy systems: resilience, reliability, security, affordability, flexibility, and sustainability. ​

Multi-input, Multi-output Hybrid Energy Systems Volume 5, Issue 1,  Pages 47-58
Maximizing Clean Energy Use: Integrating Nuclear and Renewable Technologies to Support Variable Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Demands9/18/2020

Fossil fuels are hard to beat: low cost, easy to store, and easy to transport. They enable the economic provision of variable electricity and heat to the customer because the capital cost of power plants, furnaces, and boilers is small relative to the cost of the fuel. It is economic to operate fossil plants at part load—the money is in the fuel.

​Fossil fuels are hard to beat: low cost, easy to store, and easy to transport. They enable the economic provision of variable electricity and heat to the customer because the capital cost of power plants, furnaces, and boilers is small relative to the cost of the fuel. It is economic to operate fossil plants at part load—the money is in the fuel.​

Maximizing Clean Energy Use: Integrating Nuclear and Renewable Technologies to Support Variable Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Demands
Reimagining future energy systems: Overview of the US program to maximize energy utilization via integrated nuclear‐renewable energy systems2/17/2020

​A sustainable, balanced energy portfolio is necessary for a country's continued economic growth. This portfolio must collectively be able to provide reliable, resilient electricity at stable, affordable prices

​​A sustainable, balanced energy portfolio is necessary for a country's continued economic growth. This portfolio must collectively be able to provide reliable, resilient electricity at stable, affordable prices

Reimagining future energy systems: Overview of the US program to maximize energy utilization via integrated nuclear‐renewable energy systems
US Research & Development Status for Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems1/10/2019

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) program on Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems (N-R HES) was established to evaluate potential options for the coordinated use of nuclear and renewable energy generators to meet energy demands across the electricity, industrial, and transportation sectors.​ IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 51-59 (2019). 

​With more than 170 parties having ratified the Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, viable, financially sound and integrated solutions for providing low carbon, affordable energy is of critical interest. This, by necessity, encompasses the development of resilient production processes for the generation of electricity, heat, chemicals and fuels for deep decarbonization. Two principal options for low carbon energy are renewables and nuclear energy. 

Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems for Decarbonized Energy Production and Cogeneration, IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 51-59
Opportunities and Challenges for Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems1/10/2019

Tightly coupled nuclear–renewable hybrid energy systems (N–R HESs) are systems that link subsystems to generate dispatchable electricity and produce at least one industrial product from two or more energy resources. IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 95-111

Tightly coupled nuclear–renewable hybrid energy systems (N–R HESs) are systems that link subsystems to generate dispatchable electricity and produce at least one industrial product from two or more energy resources.

Opportunities and Challenges for Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 95-111
Joint Use Modular Plant Program to Support RD&D Needs for Integrated Energy Systems1/10/2019

The premise of Joint Use Modular Plant (JUMP) Program is to enable both commercial use and research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities within a single multi-module nuclear plant, wherein a specific module would be allocated to RD&D use via a prearranged agreement between the operating utility and the national laboratory conducting the research activities. IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 194-201​​

The premise of Joint Use Modular Plant (JUMP) Program is to enable both commercial use and research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities within a single multi-module nuclear plant, wherein a specific module would be allocated to RD&D use via a prearranged agreement between the operating utility and the national laboratory conducting the research activities.

Joint Use Modular Plant Program to Support RD&D Needs for Integrated Energy Systems IAEA-TECDOC-1885, p. 194-201
Dynamic performance analysis of a high-temperature steam electrolysis plant integrated within nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems10/15/2018

​Dynamic performance analysis of a high-temperature steam electrolysis plant integrated within nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems​

A high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) plant is proposed as a flexible load resource to be integrated with a light water reactor (LWR) in nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs).

Dynamic performance analysis of a high-temperature steam electrolysis plant integrated within nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems